Democracy, Bureaucracy, and the Study of Administration

Synopsis

This anthology addresses several of the most central ideas in the field of public administration. The essays explore 'political theories' as Dwight Waldo referred to them. These ideas ultimately are not resolvable, yet they are crucial to understanding the nature of public administration practice. The tension between democracy and efficiency yields a constant struggle between being more effective and more efficient. The readings in this volume explore whether there can be a science of administration, how we should think about administrative accountability, what the nature of the relationship between citizen and state is, if professionalism is an adequate mechanism for ensuring accountability, and how efficient bureaucracy can or should be.

The ASPA Classics Volumes serve to bridge the practice of public policy and administration with the empirical research base that has accrued and the models for practice that may be deduced from research.

Additional information

Contributors:
Includes content by:
  • David M. Levitan
  • Barry D. Karl
  • Herbert A. Simon
  • Robert A. Dahl
  • L. Urwick
Publisher: Place of publication:
  • Boulder, CO
Publication year:
  • 2000