American Prejudice: With Liberty and Justice for Some

American Prejudice: With Liberty and Justice for Some

American Prejudice: With Liberty and Justice for Some

American Prejudice: With Liberty and Justice for Some

Synopsis

"Americans try to believe that class, ethnic, racial, and cultural differences and conflicts in the United States can be harmoniously blended into the proverbial American "melting pot." However, we have always been apt to categorize people as socially "acceptable" or "unacceptable." The unequal social value placed upon men, women, and children and their so-called differences have incited fear, prejudice, discrimination, and violence. Why do we allow this hatred, intolerance, and discrimination to endure?" "American Prejudice: With Liberty and Justice for Some, a brilliant essay on bigotry and intolerance, examines the social and economic roots of hatred and bias and the intellectual and ideological origins of prejudicial thinking. Drs. Richard Ropers and Dan Pence, esteemed experts on cultural diversity's impact on society, have written an explicit and perceptive text that provides insight into the predilection we as a society have for prejudice by exposing its conspicuous influences on contemporary political, religious, and judicial scenes. The authors explain how our Founding Fathers' promise of "life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness" for all is not met in the harsh reality of an America where the populace is sharply divided along lines of race, gender, class, ethnicity, and sexuality. Drs. Ropers and Pence also illustrate how the American criminal justice system panders to the contemporary climate of prejudice, discriminating against our most vulnerable groups - women and children, the elderly, and homosexuals. Can the United States still maintain its pledge to acceptance of diversity? American Prejudice is a provocative examination on the "state of hate" today as seen through the voices and actions of all who activate or alleviate violence against our own - the poor, the elderly, the non-Caucasian, women, gays, and lesbians - all of whom are the very essence of America's pluralist society. In the final years of the twentieth century, this is a much needed commentary on what we must do to achieve balance, compassion, and tolerance and will be of enormous help to sociologists, educators, human rights advocates, political scientists, and behavioral psychologists." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

American Prejudice exposes the rationalizations for racism and other forms of prejudice and bias in American society. But before discussing racial prejudices or biases, the initial questions should be: How is the term race being used and what is meant by its use? Also, how impartial is the reference to race? Is there a negative attitude implied concerning other abilities or does race refer only to external physical appearances? Frequently, race is used in context with social problems created by one or another group of people, as when the news media discuss "race riots." In this situation there is often a negative implication in the reference to race, which involves such qualitative aspects as mental and/or physical abilities. The more impartial use of race is the separation of world populations into three or more groupings usually based on skin color, hair and eye color, and sometimes eye shape. This latter use of race is most often encountered on application forms. There, a person chooses from a list of categories and places himself or herself in that race.

Physical anthropologists have described and divided the world's populations into races since the 1800s, although humans have grouped each other for centuries as part of an "in-group" or "out-group" recognition. There are physical, genetic differences between peoples today, but here race describes the physical appearances of people based on their external traits. Color is the . . .

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