Social Security in International Perspective: Essays in Honor of Eveline M. Burns

Social Security in International Perspective: Essays in Honor of Eveline M. Burns

Social Security in International Perspective: Essays in Honor of Eveline M. Burns

Social Security in International Perspective: Essays in Honor of Eveline M. Burns

Excerpt

With the publication of this volume, the Columbia University School of Social Work inaugurates the series, "Social Work and Social Issues." This is a new enterprise, but not a new concern. Social work has had broad experience over the years with social issues, on a continuum from casework to community organization--from one child to one world. Although dynamic and relevant data have been collected on issues such as poverty, delinquency, mental health, and community development, they have not been sufficiently communicated through published works. The present series, which continues the Columbia University School of Social Work tradition of scholarly activity and research, will facilitate sustained communication between the profession and the community on numerous issues of social concern. Its volumes will serve as a content base for social work education, to improve dialogue with related disciplines, and as background for public policy discussion.

Within the broad general theme, "Social Work and Social Issues," each book in the series will be independent of the other, with content arising from scholarly and systematic study. Faculty members will be associated with each volume as editor, contributors, or main author, but participation of nonfaculty will also be invited. A regular pattern of publication is anticipated, initially on a biennial basis. Where appropriate, each volume will treat substantive findings in the field, interdisciplinary concepts, and the particular implications of social work practice and social welfare policies for problem solution.

To inaugurate the series, the central issue of social security has been chosen. The problem is not to determine whether income maintenance is a critical aspect of social welfare. Society in the second half of the 20th century has, by and large, accepted the premise that no one should starve. Beyond bare subsistence, however, lies a . . .

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