The Making of the Good Neighbor Policy

The Making of the Good Neighbor Policy

The Making of the Good Neighbor Policy

The Making of the Good Neighbor Policy

Excerpt

This book attempts to delineate the rationale of the Good Neighbor policy. It came to be written out of an interest in the nature and limits of enduring, pacific, political relationships between the United States, as a great power, and the Latin American countries, as lesser powers, in the period from 1926 to 1943. The chief problems with which it deals are those of the origins and consequences of the formal and unreserved abandonment of the use of force by the United States in its relations with Latin American countries. These relations did not develop haphazardly after 1926; they were guided at first by impulses and later by political ideas that began to take the shape of principles with the sharpening of appreciation of the nature of this interstate society from which coercion was banned.

The focus of attention is on the development of ideas about compromise, collaboration, and leadership in unfamiliar political circumstances. This development is observable less in doctrinal proclamations than in the significant residues from political controversies that were settled through processes of trial and error. Outstanding among such controversies were those concerning the interference of the United States in the domestic politics of Latin American countries, and the efforts of Bolivia, Mexico, and Venezuela to revise to their advantage the positions of United States oil companies within their territories. Their courses are viewed . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.