The Pulitzer Prize Story: News Stories, Editorials, Cartoons, and Pictures from the Pulitzer Prize Collection at Columbia University

The Pulitzer Prize Story: News Stories, Editorials, Cartoons, and Pictures from the Pulitzer Prize Collection at Columbia University

The Pulitzer Prize Story: News Stories, Editorials, Cartoons, and Pictures from the Pulitzer Prize Collection at Columbia University

The Pulitzer Prize Story: News Stories, Editorials, Cartoons, and Pictures from the Pulitzer Prize Collection at Columbia University

Excerpt

The American newspaper is a friendly neighbor.

It is the best source of news and opinion in the communities it serves. It brings the world to Main Street. It is a bulwark against injustice, a strong force for better government and a better life.

It has deep convictions. It has a conscience and a heart. It is not afraid to fight for its principles and frequently does, win or lose.

Such is the image of the American newspaper that emerges from the files of the Pulitzer Prizes in Journalism after more than four decades of awards.

Yet, this is not precisely the image that the American newspaper itself has tried to project before the public for much of this century. The newspaper's concept of itself is stern and forbidding—impersonal, objective, authoritative.

Nor do the Pulitzer Prizes sustain the rather sinister image drawn of this country's press by its critics. That image is based on the "devil" theory of the press. It presupposes that the press is a profit‐ laden monster, swollen and arrogant, whose cruel purpose is monopoly, one-party political journalism, and monolithic supervision of opinion-molding.

After having blinked at such a horrendous vision, one is tempted to rush to the map and make sure that Sauk Center somehow has not changed places with Moscow.

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.