Perspectives in Critical Thinking: Essays by Teachers in Theory and Practice

Perspectives in Critical Thinking: Essays by Teachers in Theory and Practice

Perspectives in Critical Thinking: Essays by Teachers in Theory and Practice

Perspectives in Critical Thinking: Essays by Teachers in Theory and Practice

Excerpt

Providing our nation's children with educational opportunities that demand and develop their critical capacities in the interests of not translating reality but transforming it, should be the chore of each and every one of us as educators no matter what our particular disciplines, grade levels, or pedagogical positions. In the following pages you will read stories from educators who have devoted their efforts to working towards helping students and teachers do just that. They are not unlike the thousands of educators who work daily with students and teachers helping them give birth to critical, self-authored thinking. The experiences you will read about in these articles range from thinking critically with students about science, math, and social studies to helping them critically reflect on their own lives, aspirations and dreams. There are articles that focus on junior high school experiences in Washington DC as well as articles that speak to teaching point of view to young, primary students; articles that deal with service learning and others that speak to storytelling as a powerful form of learning and thinking.

In their diversity of focus, these educators share a common purpose and theme: they all strive to help their students think more critically, to govern and author their own lives and to develop good citizenship practices and interests that are tied to equality and public good. These educators all share a commitment to work and struggle to transform education and educational practices into something that is relevant to the lives of both students and teachers. By offering their stories, they provide theoretical insights as well as practical suggestions as to how we as a community of educators might highlight and build upon the best practices in our fields to achieve our desired educational reforms and visions.

We have purposely asked our contributors to write in a language of accessibility that is both popular and public so that we might abandon the . . .

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