Man's Unconquerable Mind

Man's Unconquerable Mind

Man's Unconquerable Mind

Man's Unconquerable Mind

Synopsis

Quotes from works and books in which are held copyright from Farrar, Straus and Young, New York, from Hitler's Secret Conversations, edited by H.R. Trevor-Roper; Harcourt, Brace, and Company, New York, from T.S. Eliot's Collected Poems 1909-1935; The Macmillan Company, New York, from Ralph Hodgson's Poems and from John Masefield's Odtaa; Random House, New York, from Stephen Spender's Poems.

Excerpt

In one of the noblest of Greek tragedies, a young girl learns that the body of her brother--denounced as a rebel and traitor--has been left in a desert place to rot, or to be eaten by wolves and vultures. On pain of death, the government has forbidden anyone to bury the corpse. After terrible heart- searching, the girl determines that it is her duty to break this law, although it means sacrificing her happiness and her life. Her own sister refuses to go with her, weeps, and tries to dissuade her. But she moves away toward her heroic and terrible destiny.

Soon after, a breathless sentry rushes in, to report that, in spite of the new official order and in spite of the heavy guard on the corpse, someone has visited it and performed the rites of burial. The autocratic ruler of the country, infuriated by this outrage against authority, commands that the whole area shall be searched and the criminal arrested for immediate punishment. A group of citizens hears the news with astonishment--with awe; and then breaks out into a song of solemn and heartfelt admiration for the incalculable ingenuity of human beings.

Wonders are many, but none,
none is more wondrous than man.
Man moves over the grey sea,
using the wind and the storm . . .

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