The Psychology of Aristotle: An Analysis of the Living Being

The Psychology of Aristotle: An Analysis of the Living Being

The Psychology of Aristotle: An Analysis of the Living Being

The Psychology of Aristotle: An Analysis of the Living Being

Excerpt

After two thousand years the writings of Aristotle remain unexcelled as a field of investigation for the student of philosophy. So relevant are they to the persisting questions about the universe in which man finds himself that the interpretation of Aristotle has naturally been approached from many points of interest. He has thus been the intellectual master of movements differing widely in purpose and method, and the expositions of his writings have inevitably shown the results of these divergent claims.

The aim of the present study is not to discuss and to seek a solution for the questions which have arisen in the historic expositions of Aristotle's psychology. It is rather to follow the way in which Aristotle himself develops his treatment of behavior as one aspect -- and that the most essential one -- of living things in general. In the conviction that this is the way to a clear understanding of Aristotle's psychological doctrine, the writer heartily concedes that he is the child of his age and liable to the errors that any background of approach is likely to lead to. But with this difference: that the interest of contemporary thought, and especially of contemporary psychology, seems to be so close to that . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.