Soviet Policies in China, 1917-1924

Soviet Policies in China, 1917-1924

Soviet Policies in China, 1917-1924

Soviet Policies in China, 1917-1924

Excerpt

Two mighty revolutionary streams have merged their currents. The Russian and the Chinese revolutions, starting from widely separated sources, have swelled the tide of Communism to the point of overflow, threatening to engulf all surrounding nations. So dynamic has this process been that both Marxist and non- Marxist writers have tended to view the 1950 Sino-Soviet Alliance as the inevitable outcome of historical forces. An examination of the pre-1917 record does not support this analysis, however. China suffered humiliation and exploitation at the hands of Tsarist Russia during the nineteenth century, just as she suffered at the hands of the other major world powers. Russian troops occupied Chinese territory after the Boxer Uprising in 1900, being dislodged only under direct pressure from the Western nations and Japan. Russian economic penetration of North Manchuria by means of the Chinese Eastern Railway carved out a sphere of interest in China's richest mineral and food-producing area. Secret treaties concluded between Russia and Japan before and during World War I divided North China between them in typical imperialistic manner. Russian actions down to 1917 inflamed the same hatred and antiforeign prejudices among the Chinese people that other imperialist nations encountered. There was no reason to expect the new China, struggling to throw off the infe-

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