Public Schools and Moral Education: The Influence of Horace Mann, William Torrey Harris, and John Dewey

Public Schools and Moral Education: The Influence of Horace Mann, William Torrey Harris, and John Dewey

Public Schools and Moral Education: The Influence of Horace Mann, William Torrey Harris, and John Dewey

Public Schools and Moral Education: The Influence of Horace Mann, William Torrey Harris, and John Dewey

Excerpt

The preface of a book of this kind is like the master's den in a meticulously kept mansion. Outside the den door the author may leave his wissenschaftlich apparatus and tools, and relax within while writing a few simple lines of thanks and explanation.

The extent of the present explanation is to identify the author as a Catholic priest and a Jesuit, and to mention how this book came to be written. Nearly ten years ago a group of theological students in California met in seminar to discuss the Church-State aspects of the controversy over the decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court in the Everson and McCollum cases. One by-product of the seminar sessions was a firmer conviction in the author's mind that the fervor of the controversy could be accounted for only by something deeper than the arguments aired in public. Two basic value systems seemed to be contesting a narrow passageway with neither position yielding a step. A few years later, firsthand acquaintance with the school systems in several European countries which seemed to have somewhat resolved similar problems raised higher the question as to why the American impasse remained. Later still, participation in a series of lively seminars at Columbia University's Teachers College finally brought to a writing point the ideas of the present study.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.