Executives for the Federal Service: A Program for Action in Time of Crisis

Executives for the Federal Service: A Program for Action in Time of Crisis

Executives for the Federal Service: A Program for Action in Time of Crisis

Executives for the Federal Service: A Program for Action in Time of Crisis

Excerpt

In each of two world wars the United States government has brought in executives from private life to head its emergency programs. These men--some of them dollar-a-year men, others serving under other types of appointment--have generally enlisted for the duration and have been eager to get back to their regular occupations with the return of peace.

This system, while disorderly enough at best, worked reasonably well when it was possible to assume that each war would soon be followed by a relatively long period of genuine peace. When the crisis is not profound enough to demand unreserved sacrifice by private citizens and private corporations alike, however, the problem is a more difficult one. While the man with business experience is essential in some types of federal operations, the minuteman or short-term volunteer is often no better prepared to enlist and serve in the complex area of federal administration during the long cold war than the untrained militiaman was suited for the difficult techniques of modern combat.

The crisis in our international affairs, and the resulting . . .

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