Heartbreak: The Political Memoir of a Feminist Militant

Heartbreak: The Political Memoir of a Feminist Militant

Heartbreak: The Political Memoir of a Feminist Militant

Heartbreak: The Political Memoir of a Feminist Militant

Synopsis

Always innovative, often controversial, and frequently polarizing, Andrea Dworkin has carved out a unique position as one of the women's movement's most influential figures, from the early days of consciousness-raising to the "post-feminist" present. A tireless defender of women's rights, especially the rights of those who have been raped and assaulted, and a relentless critic of pornography, Dworkin is one of feminism's most rigorous minds and fiercest crusaders.

Now, in Heartbreak, Dworkin reveals for the first time the personal side of her lifelong journey as activist and writer. By turns wry, spirited, and poignant, Dworkin tells the story of how she evolved from a childhood lover of music and books into a college activist, embraced her role as an international advocate for women, and emerged as a maverick thinker at odds with both the liberal left and the mainstream women's movement. Throughout, she displays a writer's genius for expressing emotional truth and an intellectual's gift forconveying the excitement of ideas and words. Beautifully written and surprisingly intimate, Hearbreak is a portrait of a soul, and a mind, in the making.

Excerpt

I have been asked, politely and not so politely, why I am myself. This is an accounting any woman will be called on to give if she asserts her will. in the home the question will be couched in a million cruelties, some subtle, some so egregious they rival the injuries of organized war.

A woman writer makes herself conspicuous by publishing, not by writing. Although one could argue—and I would— that publishing is essential to the development of the writing itself, there will be exceptions. After all, suppose Max Brod had burned Kafka's work as Kafka had wanted? the private writer, which Kafka was, must be more common among women than men: few men have Kafka's stunning self‐ loathing, but many women do; then again, there is the obvi-

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