Kamaaina, a Century in Hawaii

Kamaaina, a Century in Hawaii

Kamaaina, a Century in Hawaii

Kamaaina, a Century in Hawaii

Excerpt

About the time James W. Marshall, a workman at Sutter's Mill on the American River in California, was turning up the golden nuggets that brought on a great invasion of gold seekers to that area, a German sea captain and trader, H. Hackfeld, must have been turning over in his mind the plans that led to his founding on October 1, 1849, in Honolulu, the trading firm of H. Hackfeld & Company.

This firm, whose first business was mostly the sale of trade goods from Germany, prospered, and before long was expanding into other fields, principally sugar production, for which it furnished capital. As the discovery of gold in California started a great invasion of gold seekers, so the growth of the sugar industry in Hawaii similarly brought about the introduction of large numbers of laborers from the Orient to work the sugar plantations. By the time World War I arrived H. Hackfeld & Company was a flourishing enterprise that had not only prospered itself but had contributed materially to the prosperity of the Hawaiian Islands. But it was a German-owned business and was soon taken over by the Alien Property Custodian from whom, in 1918, it was purchased by a group of American citizens and reorganized as American Factors, Ltd., in which form it has continued to prosper, expand, and add to the economic well-being of the community.

The early history of the Hawaiian Islands was closely associated with that of California, after the latter's discovery of gold, so it was only natural that near San Francisco . . .

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