Postmortem: The O.J. Simpson Case: Justice Confronts Race, Domestic Violence, Lawyers, Money, and the Media

Postmortem: The O.J. Simpson Case: Justice Confronts Race, Domestic Violence, Lawyers, Money, and the Media

Postmortem: The O.J. Simpson Case: Justice Confronts Race, Domestic Violence, Lawyers, Money, and the Media

Postmortem: The O.J. Simpson Case: Justice Confronts Race, Domestic Violence, Lawyers, Money, and the Media

Excerpt

Did the jury in People v. Orenthal James Simpson reach a true and accurate conclusion when it decided that the defendant was not guilty of murdering Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman on the night of June 12, 1994? As the months pass and passions soften, many Americans on both sides of the color line have come to accept that reasonable jurors acting in good faith could have decided the state failed to prove Simpson's guilt beyond a reasonable doubt. But acknowledging that the state failed to meet its extraordinary burden of proof in criminal cases is not the same as believing Simpson is actually innocent. A plausible consensus has emerged that Simpson was "probably" guilty but the jury legitimately acquitted him nonetheless.

This consensus is not without its problems. Four hours of deliberation hardly gave the jury time to review nine months of testimony totaling over 45,000 pages of trial transcript. The DNA evidence alone warranted longer study: among other signs of Simpson's guilt, tests showed that fewer than one person in 170 million had the genetic characteristics found in a blood drop near the murdered . . .

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