Revolution in Zanzibar: An American's Cold War Tale

Revolution in Zanzibar: An American's Cold War Tale

Revolution in Zanzibar: An American's Cold War Tale

Revolution in Zanzibar: An American's Cold War Tale

Synopsis

The Cold War exploded in Zanzibar in 1964 when African rebels slaughtered one in every ten Arabs. This book provides an eyewitness account of the 1964 Zanzibar revolution as told by the only American present throughout the turmoil.

Excerpt

Americans at the end of 1963 were still reeling from the assassination of John F. Kennedy in November and taking the measure of Lyndon Johnson in the White House.

The year had seen the march on Washington of 200,000 people demanding equality for blacks with whites, a march that culminated in Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" speech at the Lincoln Memorial.

In 1963, the number of U.S. military personnel in Vietnam would increase to 15,000.

In an eight-to-one decision, the United States Supreme Court ruled that laws requiring the recitation of the Lord's Prayer or Bible verses in public schools were unconstitutional.

Sydney Poitier became the first African American to win the Academy Award for best actor; Tom Jones won the Best Picture award.

The Feminine Mystique, Silent Spring, and The Spy Who Came in from the Cold were published.

The top pop song of the year was Jimmy Gilmer and the Fireballs's "Sugar Shack"; the Beatles were big in Britain, and Beatlemania in the United States was less than a year away.

The Los Angeles Dodgers, recently transplanted from Brooklyn, beat the NewYorkYankees in the World Series.

Charles de Gaulle blocked Britain's entry into the Common Market.

Nikita Khrushchev still presided in the Kremlin but, weakened by his mistakes during the Cuban missile crisis, would soon give way to Leonid Brezhnev.

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