The Reasonableness of Christianity: With A Discourse of Miracles, and Part of A Third Letter Concerning Toleration

The Reasonableness of Christianity: With A Discourse of Miracles, and Part of A Third Letter Concerning Toleration

The Reasonableness of Christianity: With A Discourse of Miracles, and Part of A Third Letter Concerning Toleration

The Reasonableness of Christianity: With A Discourse of Miracles, and Part of A Third Letter Concerning Toleration

Excerpt

Apart from a few errata which were corrected in the second edition, there have been only very minor variations in the text of The Reasonableness of Christianity since the first edition of 1695; and the same is true of A Third Letter concerning Toleration which was published in 1692; and of A Discourse of Miracles, which was written in 1702 and first published posthumously in 1706. For convenience, the text of The Reasonableness of Christianity is reprinted from the 1731 edition; for the other reprints the text of the sixth edition of Locke's works (1759) has been used.

The Reasonableness of Christianity is a long document, and here especially, as Leslie Stephen observed generally of Locke's controversies, "Locke has no mercy on the patience of his readers". So it seemed wise to abridge the text at various points. Such abridgments are mainly by way of giving fewer scriptural discussions here and there. Very occasionally repetition of points which Locke makes elsewhere in the printed text has been omitted.

So that the reader may see for himself the extent and character of this abridgment, and also to facilitate reference, the paragraphs in this edition are numbered for the first time. A gap in enumeration means a paragraph omitted; a bracket round the paragraph number means that only a part of the original paragraph has been retained. A plain number means that the whole of the original paragraph has been printed. I hope that in this way the edition will provide abridgment without deception, and readability with usefulness. Further, the text has been modernized when this seemed also likely to contribute to its readability, and Locke's biblical references have been given the occasional correction they needed.

The text of A Discourse of Miracles is printed in full.

I.T.R.

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