The Cutting Edge: Conserving Wildlife in Logged Tropical Forests

The Cutting Edge: Conserving Wildlife in Logged Tropical Forests

The Cutting Edge: Conserving Wildlife in Logged Tropical Forests

The Cutting Edge: Conserving Wildlife in Logged Tropical Forests

Excerpt

This book presents a timely treatment of wildlife-forestry interactions, synthesizing current knowledge regarding the direct and indirect impacts of tropical timber-harvesting practices on native forest fauna. More importantly, the authors highlight opportunities for mitigating these environmental impacts in the short-term, and present directions for developing forest management techniques that protect the biological integrity of forest systems. Its origin began with the growing awareness of the conservation potential of tropical production forests, and the current threats that logging activities present to these natural communities. Early in the decade, a number of field scientists and forest resource managers met informally and identified the need to summarize all available knowledge on logging-wildlife interactions. This information was deemed critical to the development of short-term management strategies for reducing harmful impacts on native fauna and their habitats, and the identification of longer-term research priorities to address gaps in our understanding of these interactions and their impacts. These initial discussions led to a November 1996 workshop in Bolivia, hosted by BOLFOR (Bolivia Sustainable Forestry Management Project) and the Wildlife Conservation Society, where short- and longer-term recommendations on how to conserve wildlife in production forests were developed. The findings of this mixed forum, which included foresters, wildlife biologists, resource mangers, and policy makers, served as a springboard for the 30 chapters presented in this volume.

In brief, the book aims to: a) synthesize current knowledge of the impacts of forest management practices, particularly logging, on wildlife in tropical forests; b) present guidelines for timber-harvesting systems that balance economic with ecological considerations; and, c) set directions for future research, in an effort to move sustainable forest management-wildlife conservation from a theoretical entity to an applied state in production forests. Contributors were selected for their expertise in tropical forestry-wildlife interactions, and have provided relatively exhaustive reviews of their topics. In an effort to strengthen the continuity within this volume, the editors have subdivided the contributions into six sections, each with its own brief synopsis. These section overviews present a short introduction to the main theme of the section, condensed abstracts of each chapter, and a brief summary of the major issues discussed in the section. An introduction (chapter 1) and final synopsis chapter (chapter 30) also frame the key issues, present syntheses of the contributor's key points, and . . .

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