The Alamo and the Texas War of Independence, September 30, 1835 to April 21, 1836: Heroes, Myths, and History

The Alamo and the Texas War of Independence, September 30, 1835 to April 21, 1836: Heroes, Myths, and History

The Alamo and the Texas War of Independence, September 30, 1835 to April 21, 1836: Heroes, Myths, and History

The Alamo and the Texas War of Independence, September 30, 1835 to April 21, 1836: Heroes, Myths, and History

Synopsis

It was a small war- probably no more than 2,500 men were ever engaged in a single action, both sides taken together. It was a short war too, lasting only about seven months. And it was fought in what was, at the time, one of the most obscure corners of the earth. Yet the Texas War for Independence has become a heroic conflict of legendary proportions. Very few balanced accounts of Texas's epic struggle for independence have been written. Here historian Albert A. Nofi provides a splendid chronicle of the events and personalities of the war. He clearly explicates the battles of the Alamo and San Jacinto, carefully exploring the legends that have grown around them, and exposing the truth behind the myths. The Alamo offers a strategic and tactical analysis of the war, technical information about the weapons used by both sides, strength and casualty data, orders of battles, information on the financing of Texas freedom, portraits of both Texan and Mexican personalities, and the story of a little-known war at sea. Also included are maps of military movements, the most detailed tactical map of the Battle of San Jacinto available to date, and a number of fascinating illustrations. The Alamo is military history at its best: a social, political, economic, strategic, and tactical examination of the Texas War for Independence, one of the most dramatic episodes of America's colorful past.

Excerpt

It was a small war as such things go, probably no more than 2,500 men were ever engaged in a single action, both sides taken together. It was a short one too, lasting only about seven months. And it was certainly fought in what was at the time one of the most obscure corners of the world. Yet for all that, the Texas War for Independence was an heroic struggle of legendary character.

For centuries, Texas was an almost empty land. Along the coast a few small Indian tribes eked out a bare living, while much further inland the fierce Comanche battled with their neighbors. Although Spain imposed its authority in the sixteenth century, she proved unable effectively to colonize the region, her time-honored mission system failing to stimulate settlement. The region was hardly touched by history until the onset of the nineteenth century, when perhaps 4,000 settled souls inhabited it, about half of them in the vicinity of San Antonio de Bexar. But with the new century, change began to come to Mexico, and, more slowly but perhaps more decisively, to Texas.

In 1810, with Spain engaged in a life and death struggle against Napoleon, revolution broke out in Mexico. A long. and bitter struggle ensued between Revolutionaries advocating independence, and Royalists holding out for the authority of the Spanish Crown. For the Revolutionaries it was a struggle for rather vaguely defined Enlightenment-style liberal . . .

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