How Children Learn to Speak

How Children Learn to Speak

How Children Learn to Speak

How Children Learn to Speak

Excerpt

The past few decades have witnessed a growing interest in the problems of communication and the use of language in interpersonal relationships. To the linguist and philologist, to the social scientist concerned with communication patterns, to the therapist attempting to understand his patient, and to the parent helping his child learn to speak, the development of language enabling persons to communicate with each other intelligibly has long been of major concern.

At the same time, the over-all development of the individual — the physical, emotional, and social growth from birth through childhood — has been, and continues to be, an endless source of inquiry and research to professionals and to non‐ professionals as well.

To both these fields — verbal communication and child development — Dr. Lewis makes a valuable and delightfully interesting contribution, for he has performed the singular task of tracing the pattern of development of speech from the earliest sounds and cries of the infant to the mastery of mutually understood words which "admits him to the world of humankind." The pattern is not a complete one, and in the confines of a small volume, many complicated and complex matters must necessarily be condensed and simplified. Nevertheless, from his many observations, the author is able to show that there is a pattern in the growth and development of the child's language, just as there is in the total growth and development of the individual.

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