Urban Planning and Social Policy

Urban Planning and Social Policy

Urban Planning and Social Policy

Urban Planning and Social Policy

Excerpt

The initial conception of this volume arose out of a concern with the accumulation of special difficulties which cluster in and plague major cities. This accumulation of trouble threatens to undermine confidence that the urban environment can be controlled and shaped to satisfy the physical, economic, social, and esthetic needs of urban dwellers. This concern has been shared by many who have cried havoc, have produced elaborate plans, or have worried in private.

Several years ago we decided to try an unconventional way of understanding the modem city by linking the different concepts and methods of our two fields. We organized a joint seminar to explore the interplay between urban planning and social policy with the help of M.I.T. graduate students in city planning and Brandeis University graduate students in social welfare planning. The seminar has continued as a useful testing ground for expanding the concepts of city and social planning, and it has provided the basis for this book. For the opportunity to conduct this seminar we are grateful to our students and to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Brandeis University. Our colleagues have given steady encouragement, particularly Charles I. Schottland, Dean of the Florence Heller Graduate School for Advanced Studies in Social Welfare at Brandeis University. Professors Arnold Gurin and Robert Perlman of the Heller School also participated in teaching the seminar.

Professor Edward C. Banfield of Harvard University first suggested to us the need for a book which would bring together relevant contributions from the growing but scattered literature on urban social policy. Our greatest debt is to the authors who gave permission to reprint their work, for they have agreed to share the results of their varied experiences and their insights into many complex facets of urban life. Only by a pooling of such expert knowledge is it possible to construct a hopeful and coherent approach to the modem city. Their publishers were generous in permitting this re-use of their material.

The tempo of urban change is so rapid, and so pressing has been the demand to act, that several aspects of the subject demanded that original and . . .

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