Youth, Humanism, & Technology

Youth, Humanism, & Technology

Youth, Humanism, & Technology

Youth, Humanism, & Technology

Excerpt

In these days of change and uncertainty, it is difficult to determine what is mainstream sociology and what is not. This book does not necessarily meet the specifications of conventional sociology, but I believe this reflects the state of the discipline as much as the state of the book. The perspective one brings to a sociological analysis is at least partially determined by the environment in which one exists. My own orientation reflects a positivist grounding during graduate training, modified by a critical analysis of this interpretation during the turmoil of the late sixties. I concluded that some of the conventional wisdom of sociology consisted only of unproven assumptions that had been taken for granted for so long that they had taken on the appearance of truth.

The meaning of terms such as "alienation" has changed over time and has lost its original critical nature. Other terms, such as "modernization," have become almost magical and are used as explanations of other phenomena.

The reader should be aware that this book reflects my own orientation, which is partially a result of the society in which I live, just as his or her reading of the book will be affected by the perspective that he or she brings to the reading.

I have attempted to bring together some of the recent criticisms of modern industrial societies and some of the explanations of the rise of oppositional youth movements within such societies. A synthesis of this kind necessarily owes much to the ideas of others. Especially important have been the writings of Peter Berger, Richard Flacks, Louis Kelso, Snell and Gail . . .

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