A Grammar of Dreams

A Grammar of Dreams

A Grammar of Dreams

A Grammar of Dreams

Excerpt

Dreams are thoughts. Dreaming is thinking. These two principles are at once so elementary that they have been the implicit foundation of almost every modern theory of dreaming and so difficult that they never have been assimilated fully by any such theory. What are the obstacles to accepting these principles? And, what would the implications for dream psychology be were they accepted in their entirety?

Problems for a Cognitive View of Dreams

One major obstacle to a full-fledged acceptance of dreaming as thinking is our reluctance to accept responsibility for our dreams. Among many lay people and students of psychology this reluctance often takes the form of a belief in the supernatural (e.g., religious, telepathic) determination of dream content. For those who think of themselves as scientists, however, there always has been a degree of commitment to the working hypothesis that dreams, like all other mental phenomena, must be explained in terms of the natural . . .

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