Hiroshima and Nagasaki: The Physical, Medical, and Social Effects of the Atomic Bombings

Hiroshima and Nagasaki: The Physical, Medical, and Social Effects of the Atomic Bombings

Hiroshima and Nagasaki: The Physical, Medical, and Social Effects of the Atomic Bombings

Hiroshima and Nagasaki: The Physical, Medical, and Social Effects of the Atomic Bombings

Excerpt

The names Hiroshima and Nagasaki are known around the world—yet most people remain ignorant of the reality and the meaning of atomic destruction. Those who dropped the first atomic bomb worked thereafter to demonstrate its destructive powers and to justify its use as a way of ending the war quickly so as to limit the number of combat casualties. Nuclear bombs have thus become generally accepted. They have been developed and stockpiled by the United States of America and the Soviet Union on the premise that they effectively deter other countries from using them. When other major powers * acquired nuclear capability, they extended the nuclear threat to fearful proportions. The two great superpowers have sought to check the further spread of nuclear capability through a nuclear nonproliferation pact, but this effort is not convincing since it does not restrict them from adding to their own nuclear weapons. The peoples of the world who have learned the lessons of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, however, see nuclear arms no longer as useful deterrents but as dangerous weapons that could annihilate the human race. Thus, they recognize that the time has come to reverse the tide of world events.

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