When Teenagers Work: The Psychological and Social Costs of Adolescent Employment

When Teenagers Work: The Psychological and Social Costs of Adolescent Employment

When Teenagers Work: The Psychological and Social Costs of Adolescent Employment

When Teenagers Work: The Psychological and Social Costs of Adolescent Employment

Excerpt

The nature of adolescence in American society has undergone a dramatic change over the past forty years. In increasing numbers, school-age adolescents have entered the workplace, holding part-time jobs after school that consume substantial portions of their afternoons, school nights, and weekends. The large teenage, part-time labor force that staffs the counters of fast-food establishments, waits on customers in retail stores, assembles parts in industrial settings, and cleans motel rooms and office buildings has become such a familiar part of our social landscape that we may fail to note its unique character or to ponder its larger social significance.

The burgeoning teenage labor force is unique in many respects. Although adolescents have worked in other eras, those who work today have different social origins and different motivations for employment than their earlier counterparts. The work they perform is also different, both in kind and in organization. And the student worker per se is a distinctly American phenomenon. In many countries of the western world, it is virtually unheard of for youngsters to participate intensively in . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.