Distinguished Asian Americans: A Biographical Dictionary

Distinguished Asian Americans: A Biographical Dictionary

Distinguished Asian Americans: A Biographical Dictionary

Distinguished Asian Americans: A Biographical Dictionary

Synopsis

Asian Americans have made significant contributions to American society. This reference work celebrates the contributions of 166 distinguished Asian Americans. Most people profiled are not featured in any other biographical dictionary on noted Asian Americans. The Chinese Americans, Japanese Americans, Filipino Americans, Korean Americans, South Asian Americans (from India and Pakistan), and Southeast Asian Americans (from Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam) profiled in this work represent more than 75 fields of endeavor. From historical figures to figure skater Michelle Kwan, this work features both prominent and less familiar individuals who have made significant contributions in their fields. A number of the contemporary subjects have given exclusive interviews for this work.

Excerpt

This reference book features biographical profiles of 166 distinguished Asian Americans who have made significant contributions to American society. For the purpose of this work, an Asian American may be native or foreign-born. If foreign-born, the person has immigrated to the United States, most likely since the end of World War II. If native-born, the person may be a second-, third-, or fourth-generation descendant of an Asian immigrant.

For the purpose of this biographical work, the term Asian American denotes those immigrants and their descendants who came from China, India, Japan, Korea, Pakistan, the Philippines, Cambodia, Laos, or Vietnam. For the sake of convenience, four separate groups—namely Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, and Filipinos—are identified in terms of their ancestry, whereas people from India and Pakistan are grouped as South Asians and those from Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam are grouped as Southeast Asians. the latter two groupings are owing mainly to the fact that (1) the number of entries on prominent people from these countries is rather small, or (2) the boundaries of their native lands make it almost impossible to categorize them as separate groups.

Immigrants from Asian countries arrived on these shores with an American dream. the first group who came to America in large numbers were from the Chinese province of Guangdong, located in southeastern China. They began to arrive in the late 1840s after gold was discovered in California in 1848. Many came with the hopes of striking it rich and going home to live out the rest of their lives in comfort. This dream was

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