Through a Glass Darkly: Looking at Conflict Prevention, Management, and Termination

Through a Glass Darkly: Looking at Conflict Prevention, Management, and Termination

Through a Glass Darkly: Looking at Conflict Prevention, Management, and Termination

Through a Glass Darkly: Looking at Conflict Prevention, Management, and Termination

Synopsis

Cimbala shows why the prevention, management, and concluding of war all require an understanding of the subjective aspects of decision making as well as the hardware and tactics of military operations. A review of past cases of U.S. security policy decision making and a preview of some future problems are combined to distill important lessons about coping with conflict in the post-Cold War world.

Excerpt

The Cuban missile crisis of October 1962 has been the subject of numerous academic and policy studies. the basic narrative of events surrounding the crisis is by now well known to specialists and to lay readers. Interpretation of these events is another matter. Historians, policy analysts, and even former crisis participants have locked horns over the reasons for the Soviet decision to deploy offensive, nuclear-capable missiles in Cuba. the arguments will probably continue well beyond the end of the next millennium.

New perspective is needed on the Cuban missile crisis more than new facts. Some have seen the crisis as an inevitable military showdown that the United States “won” due to its larger numbers of nuclear warheads and delivery systems (missiles and bombers). Others have described the confrontation as a result of Cold War politics. in this view, each Cold War “superpower” constantly sought to manipulate political and military events to its advantage: the Cuban missile crisis resulted from Khrushchev’s strategic miscalculation by going too far and risking too much. Additional explanations have been given based on the personalities of the two heads of state involved in the crisis: U.S. President John F. Kennedy and Soviet Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev.

The factors already mentioned certainly played a part in bringing about the Cuban missile crisis at the time that it occurred. But another aspect of the crisis deserves further study: How well did the two states and their political and military leaders understand one another’s perspectives about ends, means, and military strategy in the years leading

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.