Healing Powers and Modernity: Traditional Medicine, Shamanism, and Science in Asian Societies

Healing Powers and Modernity: Traditional Medicine, Shamanism, and Science in Asian Societies

Healing Powers and Modernity: Traditional Medicine, Shamanism, and Science in Asian Societies

Healing Powers and Modernity: Traditional Medicine, Shamanism, and Science in Asian Societies

Synopsis

Connor and Samuel explore the present state of a range of healing traditions in their Asian locales. The peoples examined include relatively remote populations such as the Iban of Sarawak, the Temiar of Malaysia, and the Sasak of Lomboko, as well as rural South Indians and Malays, the people of South Korea's modern industrial cities, and Tibetans both in Chinese-controlled Tibet and in the refugee settlements of North India.

Excerpt

The chapters in this book, with the exception of the contribution by Sydney White, are selected and revised from invited papers presented at an International Research Workshop at the University of Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia, in December 1996, entitled Healing Powers and Modernity in Asian Societies. This meeting brought together a group of anthropologists who have in recent years been involved in researching issues of medicine, modernity, and healing in Asia. the workshop provided an opportunity for participants to discuss their work in a broader comparative framework, stimulated by their diverse perspectives on healing and modernity. We wish to thank all the participants in the workshop for their lively discussion of the ideas that have contributed to the chapters in this volume. We are grateful to Sydney White, who was not present at the workshop but who later kindly agreed to contribute a chapter in order to expand the geographical and comparative scope of the volume.

Research by the convenors of the workshop, Linda Connor and Geoffrey Samuel, was supported by an Australian Research Council Project Grant (“Creative Synthesis in the Therapeutic Process: An Ethnographic Study of Tibetan Healing and Biomedicine,” 1994–1997), and it was this research that originally inspired the idea for the meeting. Funding for the workshop was provided by the Faculty of Arts and Social Science and the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Newcastle. We wish to thank Janette Howell for her administrative assistance in organizing the workshop.

Carol Laderman’s chapter is a revised version of an article titled “The Limits of Magic,” which was published in American Anthropologist 99(2): 333–341.

We wish to thank K. Lalitha, and Sabala and Kranti, for the illustrations provided in Kalpana Ram’s chapter from their publications which are, respec-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.