Haughty Conquerors: Amherst and the Great Indian Uprising of 1763

Haughty Conquerors: Amherst and the Great Indian Uprising of 1763

Haughty Conquerors: Amherst and the Great Indian Uprising of 1763

Haughty Conquerors: Amherst and the Great Indian Uprising of 1763

Synopsis

During 1763 and 1764, a loose coalition of Native American tribes ranging from the Appalachian Mountains to the Mississippi River and from the Ohio Valley to the Great Lakes revolted against the oppression and neglect of their newly installed British masters. This Great Uprising ranks among the most successful wars in Native American history with the assault and capture of nine forts, the siege of Forts Detroit and Pitt, and, finally, a negotiated peace that met most of their demands. Yet, the victories proved to be fleeting as tribal enthusiasm waned. Within a generation, another wave of settlers and a frontier war would conquer much of what the unfortunate tribes would cling to with their victory.

Excerpt

‘‘Destroy Their Forts and Make Them Rue the Day’’

I am clear that too much economy ought not to be thought of as yet with the Indians, if we expect to keep them in temper & maintain our posts—but it is not in my power to convince the General thereof.

—William Johnson to George Croghan

How it may end the Lord knows; but I assure you I am of the opinion that it will not be long before we have some broils with them.

—George Croghan to Henry Bouquet

Our suspicions of their plots … are mere bugbears.

—Jeffrey Amherst to William Johnson

The English treat us with much disrespect…. They have possessed themselves of our country. It is now in our power to dispossess them and recover it…. There is no time to be lost. Let us strike immediately.

—Kayashuta

Gone were the days when the Indians could play off the French and British against each other. Only the British now provided the ammunition and other products upon which Indians had grown dependent over the previous century and a half. To attack the British would be to bite the hand that fed them. Besides, with the Union Jack flying from forts in their midst, the Indians no longer had unassailable sanctuaries from which to raid British settlements. in the face of overwhelming British power, who would dare raise their war clubs?

But British arrogance, insensitivity, and exploitation quickly drove most

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