Preaching the Reformation: The Homiletical Handbook of Urbanus Rhegius

Preaching the Reformation: The Homiletical Handbook of Urbanus Rhegius

Preaching the Reformation: The Homiletical Handbook of Urbanus Rhegius

Preaching the Reformation: The Homiletical Handbook of Urbanus Rhegius

Synopsis

"The German reformer, Urbanus Rhegius (1489-1541), wrote this homiletical handbook in 1535 for young Protestant ministers in Germany. His theological guide to preaching on controversial topics of the Reformation exposes the challenge of presenting a balanced evangelical message and the distortions that attended the reception of that message. It also discloses the close relationship between theology and piety that lay at the heart of Reformation conflicts." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

The idea of making a full English translation of the Formulae quaedam caute by the German reformer, Urbanus Rhegius (1489–1541), occurred to me not long after reading it for the first time in the late 1970s. Several things suggested that an English translation would be welcome: the original popularity of the treatise, the existence of a modern version of the German text (1908), its obvious utility for teaching the Reformation, even its fetching title. Studying the career of Rhegius and this handbook confirmed that the Reformation was a process of historical change that involved more than rethinking the essence of Christianity in a classroom. It entailed presenting these new ideas to people in a clear and balanced way, preventing and correcting misunderstandings, and then convincing people who had practiced the faith one way for generations that suddenly they should do it in a very different way. Seen through the eyes of Rhegius, the Reformation seemed much more practical than academic and more similar to the day-to-day work of clergy than to the ruminations of scholars. His handbook could be read with profit, however, by both groups and by other students of the Reformation as well.

The best presentation of the handbook, therefore, would be to offer it both in one of the original languages and in English. The opportunity to do so was provided by the series Reformation Texts With Translation, and it seemed to fit especially well into the new section on Theology and Piety. I wish to thank the general editor of the series, Prof. Kenneth Hagen, Em., and the editor of the Theology and Piety section, Prof. Ian Levy, for accepting this text into their series and for their counsel on the process of publication. Prof. Levy and Prof. Hagen carefully read the Latin text and the translation and made helpful suggestions. Anna Marie Johnson also read the English text and noted corrections for me. Although I accepted most of their suggestions and corrections, the accuracy of the Latin text reproduced here and of the translation is my responsibility alone. Credit for the fine production of the text belongs to Joan Skocir and Marquette University Press.

The various editions of the Formulae quaedam caute have been brought to my attention over the years by a number of libraries and . . .

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