The Unprepared Society: Planning for a Precarious Future

The Unprepared Society: Planning for a Precarious Future

The Unprepared Society: Planning for a Precarious Future

The Unprepared Society: Planning for a Precarious Future

Excerpt

WARD MADDEN

Chairman, Commission on Lectures
The John Dewey Society for the Study of Education and Culture

THE LAST FEW YEARS have seen the rise of an activity that Donald N. Michael calls "futurism." It is one of the striking phenomena of the times, and takes many forms, The Unprepared Society itself being one example. Futurists are men who are using rather recently developed intellectual and scientific techniques, as well as some older methods, to anticipate social and technological developments years or decades before they occur. Most of them are also concerned with the problems of preparing to cope with the conditions they forecast, and most of them are aware of, or are involved in, the realities of the effort to organize society politically to confront its futures. Hence Andrew Kopkind has called them "the future-planners," while Bertram Gross has dubbed them "technopols."

Although current examples of futurism vary in quality, viability, and direction, their proliferation suggests a trend.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.