Congress and the Common Good

Congress and the Common Good

Congress and the Common Good

Congress and the Common Good

Excerpt

The seed of this book is the lectures that I have given at Harvard on executive—legislative relations and on Congress over the last twenty-three years, in Gov. 130, the basic undergraduate course on U.S. national government, and in courses and research seminars for graduate students.

The book is on political institutions and procedures. I am interested in how legislative institutions at different levels—the whole House, legislative leadership groups, committees, congressmen's offices—receive advice from those to whom they are accountable; how they exercise the discretion that is available to them, especially how they deliberate; and how they instruct those who will carry out their decisions. Since congressional decision making is almost always dominated by the nature of relations between the Executive and Congress, attention is also given to the several levels of executive institutions and to connections between them and Congress—between bureaus and committees, for example, or the White House and congressional leadership groups. I am interested also in the reciprocal relations between political institutions, on the one hand, and elections, public opinion, and the conduct of individual political actors, on the other. But the focus throughout is institutions, not political behavior.

The book is on Congress, yet it is directed principally to the House of Representatives rather than the Senate. There are a number of reasons for this. The House is easier to study. The sample of actors is more than four times as large and the chamber has more structure. Political scientists have studied . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.