The Structure of Morale

The Structure of Morale

The Structure of Morale

The Structure of Morale

Excerpt

For some two years there have been sent to the Psychological Laboratory in Cambridge groups, first of officers and training regiments and then of A.T.S., to receive instruction chiefly in technical methods of selection and training of personnel. I was asked to lecture to them on subjects of a more general nature and, at first, I gave them talks on the subjects they proposed. It soon appeared that they were all interested chiefly in the same problems and the lectures became a routine discussion of the same topics. From the first, it was asked by members of the classes that the lectures should be published and the demand was sufficiently consistent for me to consider it. But pressure of other work made the task of writing them up impossible until some time could be stolen for this purpose during the past few months.

There is but one excuse for stating these facts. The general principles laid down in this book are the same as those given in the earliest lectures. The illustrations used refer, chiefly, to experiences we have had since those first lectures were delivered. What were then predictions are now a matter of history. This, of course, does not constitute proof in any proper scientific sense, but it at least creates a presumption of validity for the theories propounded.

Finally, I wish to express my deep thanks to Mr Herbert Jones for his tireless skill in the dull task of editing and correcting the typescript for publication.

J. T. M.

21 April 1942 . . .

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