Franklin D. Roosevelt's World Order

Franklin D. Roosevelt's World Order

Franklin D. Roosevelt's World Order

Franklin D. Roosevelt's World Order

Excerpt

This book is essentially a case study of the international thinking of a twentieth century political practitioner--Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The study attempts to answer the three following questions: (1) What was Roosevelt's explanation for the breakdown of the world order of his time? (2) What, in his view, were the implications of that breakdown for the United States? and (3) What kind of a world order did he want to see replace the order that had broken down? Answers to the first two questions are attempted in three skeleton-like chapters, with the bulk of the book devoted to the third question.

Most students of theories of international relations prefer to study the ideas of great thinkers and they rarely devote themselves to the thinking of practical politicians, few of whom are profoundly reflective or philosophic. It is my hope, however, that our understanding of the behavior of statesmen and states will be illuminated by case studies of the sort presented here.

Although Roosevelt was not a thinker of the calibre of Frederick the Great, Edmund Burke, Woodrow Wilson, or perhaps even Winston Churchill, he had a quick, perceptive mind with ability to grasp the heart of a problem quickly and to understand the inter-relation of many factors involved. Roosevelt also appears to have possessed a relatively vast body of knowledge. The idea that he was largely ignorant of economics has, I think, been proved false. The allegation that his seemingly inexhaustible knowledge of history was a "grab bag" of odds and ends and that he was bored by serious analytical history contains much truth . . .

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