Marriage and Family Counseling: A Manual for Ministers, Doctors, Lawyers, Teachers, Social Workers, and Others Engaged in Counseling Service

Marriage and Family Counseling: A Manual for Ministers, Doctors, Lawyers, Teachers, Social Workers, and Others Engaged in Counseling Service

Marriage and Family Counseling: A Manual for Ministers, Doctors, Lawyers, Teachers, Social Workers, and Others Engaged in Counseling Service

Marriage and Family Counseling: A Manual for Ministers, Doctors, Lawyers, Teachers, Social Workers, and Others Engaged in Counseling Service

Excerpt

This introduction to marriage and family counseling has grown out of a long and instructive experience. As associate rabbi and director of Social Service of the Free Synagogue since its founding in 1907 I have met a multitude of men and women in distress because of marital and family difficulties. These men and women have come from different races, religions, nationalities, and social groups. As professor of social service in the Jewish Institute of Religion since its organization in 1922 I have had the opportunity of giving courses on marriage and the family and of discussing marriage and family problems with class after class of young men. As a member of the National Conference of Family Relations, the New York State Conference on Marriage and the Family, the Jewish Institute on Marriage and the Family, and the Committee on Marriage, the Family, and the Home of the Central Conference of American Rabbis I have enjoyed the privilege of meeting with the leaders in the field of marriage and family service. In both committees and conferences we have considered carefully the problems we are facing in family life today.

In studying my experience and in organizing the material for this book I have found that the major problems of marriage and family life fall into five categories: the legal, the economic, the biological, the psychological, the ethical or spiritual. The problems, however, are seldom simple; they are as a rule complex. The distress is due not to one but to a number of factors. It is therefore necessary to examine every circle of life in which the cause or causes of distress may be discovered: the circle of the individual, the circle of the family, the home, the neigh-

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