Industrialization and Imperialism, 1800-1914: A Biographical Dictionary

Industrialization and Imperialism, 1800-1914: A Biographical Dictionary

Industrialization and Imperialism, 1800-1914: A Biographical Dictionary

Industrialization and Imperialism, 1800-1914: A Biographical Dictionary

Synopsis

This book presents an age of nationalism, imperialism, modernization, industrialism, and great cultural achievement, stretching from 1800, when Europe was awash in the wake of the French Revolution, the reign of terror, and the coming rise of Napoleon, to Archduke Franz Ferdinand's assassination in 1914.

Excerpt

The present volume in the Greenwood Press series the Great Cultural Eras of the Western World covers the period from 1800 to the outbreak of World War I in 1914. The title, Industrialization and Imperialism, conveys a sense of the themes covered. From Napoléon Bonaparte’s rise in the 1800s to Archduke Franz Ferdinand’s assassination in 1914, the reader will find many individuals who were key figures on the imperialist and nationalist stage. One will also find inventors and industrialists who made major contributions to the industrialization and modernization of Western culture. This book is not limited, however, to imperialists and industrialists. In keeping with the theme of the series, the volume includes the most significant cultural and intellectual figures of the era.

In 1800, Europe, in the wake of the French Revolution, was awash in the Reign of Terror and Napoléon had begun his rise to power. The first event of significance listed in the Chronology is, appropriately, Napoléon’s victory over Austria at the Battle of Marengo. With this victory, another event of great historical importance was soon to follow—the end of the Holy Roman Empire. Napoléon’s broad sweep through Europe and his inauguration of the Continental System set the political agenda for much of what would follow politically even after his defeat.

When Napoléon was defeated, for the final time, at the Battle of Waterloo, Europe quickly set in place safeguards to prevent the dominance of a single European country. Under the guidance of Metternich, the Congress of Vienna produced a set of agreements designed to restore the stability of Europe that had preceded the French Revolution. The Congress of Vienna also sought to keep reform movements in check, and Metternich himself did not hesitate to put down potential reform movements. England, however, was less concerned with reform movements and, in fact, led the way in franchising voters, but wanted unimpeded access to foreign markets. England got what she wanted and was able to solidify and enhance her imperial reach. . .

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