The Latino Student's Guide to College Success

The Latino Student's Guide to College Success

The Latino Student's Guide to College Success

The Latino Student's Guide to College Success

Synopsis

Latinos, recognizing the importance of a college degree in being successful in the United States, are pursuing higher education in greater numbers. The Latino Student's Guide to College Success, written by Latino education experts, provides solid, up-to-date advice directed specifically to Latinos contemplating, preparing for, or already in the university or community college setting. This volume contains the "8 Steps to College Success," numerous vignettes of notable Latinos in many fields who give their personal story of how they succeeded in college and their advice for today's students, and a directory of top Latino universities and community colleges. Every Latino high school student as well as school counselors and libraries serving the Latino community will welcome this helpful guide.

Excerpt

Why is this book important to Latinos and to the staff of colleges and universities? First, to succeed in the United States and in the world economy, one will have to be highly educated. In fact, now that the world economy is based on an information society, a college education is a must. Technology will advance the future rapidly and create new opportunities presently not known. College-educated persons will be better prepared to compete in such a society. Moreover, there is an advantage factor. Those persons who have a college education will earn more money over the span of their careers than those without a college education. As shown in this book, the latest reports (as of this writing, 1997) by the Census Bureau find that Latino men with a college degree earn about $11,000 more a year than do non–college educated Latinos ($31,635 versus $20,617). Throughout a forty-year working lifetime, this difference is over $440,000. Similarly, Latina women with a college degree earn roughly $28,550 a year, whereas women high school graduates earn only $14,747. Again, looking at it from a working lifespan, this constitutes a difference of $550,000.

Second, it is important that an increasing number of Latinos go to college and graduate because up to this point Latinos have been badly underrepresented, not just in the student body but also in faculty and administrative positions. Since the late 1960s, when Latinos began to be admitted into college in slightly greater numbers as a result of the civil rights movement, the national average of Latino enrollments has been about 10 to 20 percent. In 1999 the Educational Testing Service (ETS) reported that only 22 percent were enrolled in college. Of this small number, between 60 and 80

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