Collection Management for the 21st Century: A Handbook for Librarians

Collection Management for the 21st Century: A Handbook for Librarians

Collection Management for the 21st Century: A Handbook for Librarians

Collection Management for the 21st Century: A Handbook for Librarians

Synopsis

Collection management is becoming increasingly complex due to electronic access to information, the growth of the Internet, greater reliance on document delivery and resource sharing, and changes in scholarly communication. This professional reference shows how changes in all aspects of collection management will affect future activities in this area and examines the likely value of these changes in the next century. Chapters are written by leading practitioners and academics from around the world, and the volume concludes with a bibliographical essay.

Excerpt

G. E. Gorman

Mea culpa, mea maxima culpa—a confession is in order at the outset. This professional reference on collection management derives from a personal view of what is likely to be important in coming years, rather than by any consensus among practitioners that these are the pressing issues of our time. Over a period of years, wide professional reading in current monographic and serial literature on collection development and collection management has suggested that certain topics are likely to have enduring interest, and to open exciting new possibilities, as we turn the page on one century in modern librarianship to see what will unfold on the page of a new century. The result, in this volume devoted to development and change in the rapidly evolving field of collection management, is a set of contributions based around eight nodes: the future for collection management (one chapter); the technological contribution to collection management (two chapters); selection of materials in an electronic environment (two chapters); future practices in collection evaluation (two chapters); electronic document delivery and resource preservation (two chapters); organization and budgeting in collection management (two chapters); cooperative collection development and management (three chapters); and the recent literature (one chapter).

There is yet a second confession—practitioners were not polled to determine their choices of ‘‘best authors,’’ but again a set of personal criteria was employed in selecting possible contributors. In choosing possible authors, several questions were asked. First, does the candidate write on issues of current and

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