Managing Business Collections in Libraries

Managing Business Collections in Libraries

Managing Business Collections in Libraries

Managing Business Collections in Libraries

Synopsis

Business information is in strong demand by a wide range of library patrons. Academic librarians must meet the needs of undergraduates, graduates, and faculty who require information about businesses for their coursework and research; school librarians must deal with sophisticated financial questions from students in a variety of classes; public librarians must provide investors and job seekers with information about financial trends, prospective employers, and particular industries; and special librarians must provide their users with immediate and current data about clients, competitors, and markets. This professional management guide offers valuable, practical advice to all types of librarians new to providing business information to a wide range of clients wth differing needs.

Excerpt

The aim of Managing Business Collections in Libraries is to provide useful information and practical assistance to librarians new to managing business collections. Since business collections today may be found in many types of libraries (school, public, community college, college, university, and special), this book is intended to help all librarians unfamiliar with the field confront the challenges of managing such collections. the book’s focus is pragmatic rather than theoretical.

Business collections may be defined in a variety of ways. For the purposes of this book, business collections will be interpreted as the information resources pertaining to the creation, development, and administration of profit and not-for-profit organizations and enterprises. These resources may be used by practitioners, students, researchers, teachers, or advisors. For most libraries, business collections form a part of their holdings. For other libraries, business collections form the core of their holdings. Yet, the demands on all business collections have increased dramatically in recent years.

The book consists of fourteen chapters written by librarians with expertise and experience in various areas of managing business collections. Chapters 1 and 13 offer essays, which serve as ‘‘bookends’’ to the rest of the text. Chapter 1 provides a perspective on the historical foundations for business collections, while Chapter 13 offers a commentary on the future of business collections. Chapters 2 through 4 deal with administrative issues of planning, budget and finance, personnel, and facilities. Chapters 5 through 10 cover selecting, ac-

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