Chinese Communication Theory and Research: Reflections, New Frontiers, and New Directions

Chinese Communication Theory and Research: Reflections, New Frontiers, and New Directions

Chinese Communication Theory and Research: Reflections, New Frontiers, and New Directions

Chinese Communication Theory and Research: Reflections, New Frontiers, and New Directions

Synopsis

A systematic examination of Chinese communication scholarship and comprehensive critique of its theories and methodologies are long overdue, and in this new collection of essays by a multicultural group of scholars, both aims are achieved. Focusing on such relatively new fields as Chinese health communication and Chinese communication on the internet, the volume addresses key questions about the state and the future of its field. Both challenging and complementing the Western views of communication, it advances theories of cultural and intercultural communication while at the same time broadening our understanding of the relevance of Chinese communication studies to communication studies overall, and the ways in which this subdiscipline points the way toward a new and more complicated future.

Excerpt

Wenshan Jia

ORIGIN

Having finished my book chapter “Chinese Communication Scholarship as an Expansion of the Communication and Culture Paradigm” (Jia, 2000), which was first presented at a panel on “Chinese Communication Research: Lessons Learned, New Directions” at the NCA 1998 Annual Convention in New York City, I realized this: If the field of communication in the United States had included other cultural views of communication and if scholars and students of Chinese communication studies had been more critical of the concepts, theories, and methods they used in their studies of Chinese communication, the field of Chinese communication could have advanced significantly and made a larger contribution to the general field of communication. I also realized that one book chapter is not sufficient to review and critique a large body of scholarship called Chinese communication studies. I thought of editing a volume such as the present one and told D. Ray Heisey about it, knowing that he was editing a communication series titled Advances in Communication and Culture. Prof. Heisey lauded the idea, which was later supported by Xing Lu, my second editor. During the past two years, we received twenty-five submissions, out of which we chose sixteen chapters.

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