Investment in the New Cuban Tourist Industry: A Guide to Entrepreneurial Opportunities

Investment in the New Cuban Tourist Industry: A Guide to Entrepreneurial Opportunities

Investment in the New Cuban Tourist Industry: A Guide to Entrepreneurial Opportunities

Investment in the New Cuban Tourist Industry: A Guide to Entrepreneurial Opportunities

Synopsis

Miller and Henthorne give U.S. investors and entrepreneurs the insights they need to capitalize upon the rapidly expanding, but still open, Cuban tourism industry--the island's major industry. This authoritative examination of the market for Cuban tourism provides comprehensive information on Cuban contacts and data sources that are accessible to foreigners; insights into the competition and possible competitive strategies, plus the general background on Cuba and its economy that investors must have for an understanding of Cuba's potential. With its lists of references and contacts, Miller and Henthorne's study will be invaluable to international tourism executives, particularly specialists in strategic planning and the development of strategic business alliances as well as international marketers and business development officers.

Excerpt

Cuba today is an admixture of tourism old and new. Cuban tourism agencies recently have refurbished Havana’s Nacional and Riviera Hotels (U.S. organized-crime figure Meyer Lansky managed the former’s casino operations and built the latter). Both hotels gleam and thrive today in the same splendor that tourists enjoyed in the 1950s, though their casino halls stand empty today. a Spanish firm is renovating the former Hilton—now the Habana Libre (“Free Havana”)—as a major business and convention hotel. Sloppy Joe’s Bar no longer exists in downtown Havana, but Canadians and Europeans still down daiquirís and mojitos in the famous Hemingway haunts of La Floridita and La Bogedita del Medio taverns. the Tropicana nightclub still stages nightly spectaculars.

Major new tourist attractions since the 1950s include Havana’s Museum of the Revolution, housed in Fulgencio Batista’s palatial offices, and developments on Caye Coco and once-virgin beaches around the island. Tourists sport Che Guevara T-shirts. Cuban-European joint ventures operate cruise ships from Cuba to other Caribbean destinations.

In contrast to other Caribbean tourism centers, children on the street are reasonably well nourished and healthy. Beggars are comparatively few, and street crime is low. Shantytowns and other signs of severe poverty are nonexistent, or at least well out of view. Nearly all the tour guides, recep-

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