Italian Cinema and Modern European Literatures, 1945-2000

Italian Cinema and Modern European Literatures, 1945-2000

Italian Cinema and Modern European Literatures, 1945-2000

Italian Cinema and Modern European Literatures, 1945-2000

Synopsis

The history of cinema, and notably that of postwar Italian cinema, can be adequately understood only in the context of other contiguous cultural disciplines. World literature, including that of France, Germany, and Russia, played a key role in the development of postwar Italian film and the cinematic technique it has come to embody. Moving away from the usual modes of defining this period--a trajectory that begins with neorealism and ends with Bertolucci--author Carlo Testa offers proof that coming to terms with literary texts is an essential step toward understanding the motion pictures they influenced.

Excerpt

Great cinema needs great issues.

Ettore Scola

I don’t know what the public “needs”—nor do I want to know. When the public sees films it likes, it just grabs them, and decrees their success.

Nanni Moretti

Film and History

Film and society? A constant interaction, rather than a mere correlation.

Pierre Sorlin, The Film in History

It is…not a question of repudiating interpretation but of situating its protocols within a broader historical inquiry….

Some frameworks are more complex, precise, and nuanced than others; some reveal anomalies and counterexamples rather than mask them off.

The inferences produced by broad and nuanced frames of reference are thus more likely to capture fresh and significant aspects of the phenomenon.

A theoretically rigorous historical scholarship is at present a strong candidate for reinvigorating film study.

David Bordwell, Making Meaning

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.