Managing Globalization in Developing Countries and Transition Economies: Building Capacities for a Changing World

Managing Globalization in Developing Countries and Transition Economies: Building Capacities for a Changing World

Managing Globalization in Developing Countries and Transition Economies: Building Capacities for a Changing World

Managing Globalization in Developing Countries and Transition Economies: Building Capacities for a Changing World

Synopsis

Kiggundu argues that we, the incipient global society comprised of governments, corporations, NGOs, and individuals, must take a strategic approach to managing globalization. He explores strategies in the fields of public sector reform, governmental use of technology, foreign direct investment and international trade policy, the evolving World Trade Organization, cultures of entrepreneurship, labor standards, and environmental protection.

Excerpt

Twenty years ago, the word globalization hardly existed in daily use. Today, it is used extensively and evokes strong intellectual and emotional debate and reactions. Globalization has come to characterize the end of the twentieth century and the beginning of the new millennium. It makes and unmakes individuals, families, organizations, communities, and nation–states. Some think it will save the world; others are convinced it will destroy it. It differentiates and integrates. Those who drive it are exalted and at the same time condemned. After more than ten years of breaking walls, liberalization, democratization, increasing international trade and investment flows, and street demonstrations, the message is beginning to sink in: Globalization is here to stay. Those with the capacity to manage it effectively will cope and even thrive; those without will lose, suffer, and stay behind. Those who isolate themselves from the global economy and the global society will remain permanently handicapped. Winners will be those with the capacity and motivation to manage globalization in all its aspects for mutual benefit. It is not a quick fix, therefore winners must also be able to persevere and have the capacity for staying power. World reaction to the events of September 11, 2001, confirm the resilience of globalization in the face of adversity. Governments, corporations, institutions, and individuals will seek ways to protect themselves against terror but will not give up globalization to terror. The socioeconomic logic, governance, and infrastructure that drive globalization have not diminished.

This book is about the opportunities and challenges globalization offers to developing countries and transition economies. Globalization offers these countries the opportunity for economic, political, social, and cultural development. By participating in the global economy, these counties increase their chances of reducing poverty, raising wages and incomes, and accumulating wealth. By interacting with other open societies in the world, they create favorable conditions for democratic development, and by improving the quality of public management, they can mobilize resources and improve services such as health care to their citizens. The central message is that globalization is not a unitary concept. It is not only about trade and investments. Rather, it is complex, dynamic, and multidimensional and needs to be understood by individuals, families, groups, communities, and public and private sector organizations in order to maximize its potential benefits and minimize its inevitable unintended adverse effects. Globalization does not happen by accident; it needs effective leadership, planning, resourcing, and management by both the public and the private sectors working together at all levels of society.

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