Groundbreaking Scientific Experiments, Inventions, and Discoveries of the 17th Century

Groundbreaking Scientific Experiments, Inventions, and Discoveries of the 17th Century

Groundbreaking Scientific Experiments, Inventions, and Discoveries of the 17th Century

Groundbreaking Scientific Experiments, Inventions, and Discoveries of the 17th Century

Synopsis

The 17th century was a time of transition for the study of science and mathematics. The technological achievements of this time directly impacted both society and the future of science. This reference resource explores the major scientific and mathematical milestones of this era, and examines them from their scientific and sociological perspectives. Over fifty entries, arranged alphabetically, illustrate how this time period marked the first widespread application of experimentation and mathematics to the study of science--an exciting time brought to life through this unique exploration.

Excerpt

The material contained in five volumes in this series of historical groundbreaking experiments, discoveries, and inventions encompasses many centuries from the pre-historic period up to the twentieth century. Topics are explored from the time of pre-historic humans, the age of classical Greek and Roman science, the Christian era, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance period from the years 1350 to 1600, the beginnings of modern science of the 17 century, and great inventions, discoveries, and experiments of the 18 and 19 centuries. This historical approach to science by Greenwood Press is intended to provide students with the materials needed to examine science as a specialized discipline. The authors present the topics for each historical period alphabetically and include information about the women and men responsible for specific experiments, discoveries and inventions.

All volumes concentrate on the physical and life sciences and follow the same historical format that describes the scientific developments of that period. In addition to the science of each historical period, the authors explore the implications of how historical groundbreaking experiments, discoveries, and inventions influenced the thoughts and theories of future scientists, and how these developments affected peoples’ lives.

As readers progress through the volumes, it will become obvious that the nature of science is cumulative. In other words, scientists of one historical period draw upon and add to the ideas and theories of earlier periods. This is evident in contrast to the recent irrationalist philosophy of the history and sociology of science that views science, not as a unique, self-correcting human empirical inductive activity, but as just another social or cultural activity where scientific knowledge is

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