Plain Talk from a Campus

Plain Talk from a Campus

Plain Talk from a Campus

Plain Talk from a Campus

Excerpt

A university president must do a lot of writing and speaking. There is considerable pressure upon a man so situated to do more of both than his other full-time duties permit him to do thoughtfully and well. My share of off-the-top speeches has been delivered. Sometimes thoughts have been put to paper, too, before they were by any means final statements. Generally, however, it has been my policy to accept a minimum number of such commitments. I have selected both occasions and subjects that related to my particular experience as a public and educational administrator, a college teacher, and sometime political scientist.

A word about my feeling toward scholarship may be helpful. In addition to doing constant and wide reading, I have always held, a keen student of government should be in public buildings and legislative halls quite as much as the clinician is in the hospital and the autopsy room. This participation should be professional and definitely not of the narrow partisan variety; obviously the latter destroys the objectivity that a knowledgeable scholar should have. Likewise, higher education, to be understood in all its aspects, requires a man to be involved in it in more ways than the teaching and researching professorship allows. Thus, I write not only as a teacher but as a onetime state finance officer, an undersecretary of a federal department, and a university president. Such participation has, I hope, given certain insights and reality to what I have written.

At the same time, being so immersed in affairs has its definite limitations. Among others, it limits the time available to write a book in one piece that articulates all the ideas that experience and . . .

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