The Armed Forces of Pakistan

The Armed Forces of Pakistan

The Armed Forces of Pakistan

The Armed Forces of Pakistan

Synopsis

"A authoritative, timely analysis of the armed forces of Pakistan - a key player in one of the world's most volatile regions. Assesses the role of the forces in Pakistani defence, policy and strategy and provides the most comprehensive description available of the country's military capabilities."

Excerpt

Professor Pervaiz Iqbal Cheema, Pakistan's leading strategic and defence analyst, is probably the only person who could have written an authoritative, comprehensive,detailed and balanced account of Pakistan's armed forces. The subject is vast, complex and controversial and has heretofore defied rendition in a single volume.

With a total active armed forces exceeding 600 000 and a reserve of more than half a million, Pakistan has one of the ten largest armed forces in the world. But its defence expenditure accounts for almost one-quarter of government spending, and has undoubtedly contributed to the country's perennial economic difficulties.

Pakistan has the eighth largest nuclear weapons capability in the world. Its Ghauri missile has a range of 1500 kilometres. However, its nuclear command and control system is fairly primitive–it is vulnerable, has little redundancy and poor technical capability, and invites pre-emption in crisis situations. It also raises the spectre of inadvertent or unauthorised use of nuclear weapons.

The subcontinent is prone to wars and crisis situations. In addition to the three major wars between Pakistan and India–the wars over Kashmir in 1947–49 and in 1965, and the 1971 war which resulted in the dismemberment of East Pakistan (Bangladesh)–there have been innumerable border skirmishes as well as almost continuous conflicts in Kashmir itself.

And since 11 September 2001, Pakistan is on the frontline of the US-led war against terrorism, with . . .

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