The Emergence of a National Economy: An Economic History of Indonesia, 1800-2000

The Emergence of a National Economy: An Economic History of Indonesia, 1800-2000

The Emergence of a National Economy: An Economic History of Indonesia, 1800-2000

The Emergence of a National Economy: An Economic History of Indonesia, 1800-2000

Synopsis

"The overarching themes of globalisation, state formation and economic integration help to explain the texture of Indonesia's past two centuries and why the future is likely to be different."

Excerpt

Demise of Soeharto's New Order in May 1998 has revived Indonesian history as a field of critical study. The arrogant triumphalism of New Order development is no longer ‘the end of history’. Authoritarian rule founded on military repression can no longer be excused as the price of development or a manifestation of ‘Asian values’. Even before the June 1999 general elections restored party politics and gave voice back to the people, reassessment had begun of the ‘Old Order’, both Sukarno's Guided Democracy and the preceding period of parliamentary democracy. The necessity of revisiting the meaning and ideals of Independence draws attention even further back to the colonial period. Yet this is very much a revival of political history, for which there are rich veins of literature. By contrast, apart from the excellent pre-crisis study of Booth (1998a), there are no overviews of Indonesia's modern economic history. And even Booth's The Indonesian Economy in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries is written for readers with some background in economics. The growing body of detailed academic literature has not been made accessible to the general reader. In light of the New Order's materialist preoccupation with economic development, this is quite puzzling and perpetuates a dangerous lack of understanding of the connections between political and economic development.

Economic history is a hybrid discipline, theorised by economists but also studied by historians. This book, which brings together both economists and historians, is a holistic study addressed to students with a background in history, economics and/or politics. The approach is broadly chronological, with the chapters integrated by three grand themes. First, by way of context, is globalisation—no new phenomenon but a centuries-long interaction between the region and the world economy; second, state formation, the gradual, trial-and-error construction of a colonial state that eventually became . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.