Using Literature to Help Troubled Teenagers Cope with Health Issues

Using Literature to Help Troubled Teenagers Cope with Health Issues

Using Literature to Help Troubled Teenagers Cope with Health Issues

Using Literature to Help Troubled Teenagers Cope with Health Issues

Synopsis

The traditional illnesses and high risk behaviors of today's adolescents have become interwoven due to the multitude of physical, social and emotional changes young people experience. Through appropriate literature, adolescents can find the power to heal and renew their lives. This reference resource provides a link for teachers, media specialists, parents, and other adults to those novels that can help adolescents struggling with health issues. Educators and therapists explore novels where common health issues are addressed in ways to captivate teens. Using fictional characters, these experts provide guidance on encouraging adolescents to cope while improving their reading and writing skills.

Excerpt

The idea for this six-volume series—addressing family issues, identity issues, social issues, abuse issues, health issues, and death and dying issues—came while I, myself, was going to a therapist to help me deal with the loss of a loved one. My therapy revealed that I was a “severe trauma survivor” and I had to process the emotions of a bad period of time during my childhood. I was amazed that a trauma of my youth could be triggered by an emotional upset in my adult life. After an amazing breakthrough that occurred after extensive reading, writing, and talking, I looked at my therapist and said, “My God! I’m like the gifted child with the best teacher. What about all of those children who survive situations worse than mine and do not choose education as their escape of choice?” I began to wonder about the huge number of troubled teenagers who were not getting the professional treatment they needed. I pondered about those adolescents who were fortunate enough to get psychological treatment but were illiterate. Finally, I began to question if there were ways to help them while also improving their literacy development.

My thinking generated two theories on which this series is based: (1) Being literate increases a person’s chances of emotional health, and (2) Twenty-five percent of today’s students are “unteachable.” The first theory was generated by my pondering these two statistics: 80% of our prisoners are illiterate (Hodgkinson, 1991), and 80% of our prisoners have been sexually abused (Child Abuse Council, 1993). If a correlation actually exists between these two statistics, then it suggests a strong need

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