Georgian Oxford: University Politics in the Eighteenth Century

Georgian Oxford: University Politics in the Eighteenth Century

Georgian Oxford: University Politics in the Eighteenth Century

Georgian Oxford: University Politics in the Eighteenth Century

Excerpt

This study aims to cast light on certain aspects of Oxford life in one of its less esteemed and less understood periods, and on one of the many varieties of eighteenth-century Toryism of which much remains to be learned. It is not a tract for the times, though not a few of the issues raised in it have become painfully familiar of late years. I cannot hope to have successfully surmounted all the hazards of college history, but must plead that progress in the writing of college history waits upon a fuller knowledge of university affairs. My obligations are legion. To Sir Lewis Namier I owe my first introduction to the Newdigate MSS. from which this study grew; his patience with young students grows no less with the years, and the archive of the History of Parliament has become a bottomless well of information for all who will make use of it. I am particularly indebted to him for permission to use his transcripts of the Bute MSS., and to Lord Lansdowne and the Trustees of the History of Parliament for access to transcripts of the Bowood MSS. My best thanks are due to Mr. Humphrey Fitzroy Newdegate for permission to use the papers of Sir Roger Newdigate, to the Earl of Aylesford for hospitality and access to his family papers, and to the Earl of Harrowby for the loan of a typescript copy of the MS. Diary of Sir Dudley Ryder. Through the kindness of the Wake Trustees and Librarian of Christ Church I was able to make use of the valuable papers of Archbishop Wake, and the Trustees of Dr. William's Library admitted me to their collections of Lindsey MSS., Blackburne MSS., and Disney Papers. For permission to examine the rest of the Lindsey MSS. I am indebted to the late Principal of the Unitarian College, Manchester. My obligations to authorities of the University and colleges of Oxford are too numerous to record in full, but I am particularly grateful to Mr. W. A. Pantin for access to the university archives and Provost Carter's Memorandum Book, and to the Warden and Librarian of All Souls, the Librarian of Balliol, the Custos Archivorum of Exeter, the President of Magdalen, and the Librarian of Queen's for access to manuscripts in their charge. The county archivists at Warwick and Lamport Hall dealt helpfully with inconvenient requests, and whatever . . .

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