The Two-Year College: A Social Synthesis

The Two-Year College: A Social Synthesis

The Two-Year College: A Social Synthesis

The Two-Year College: A Social Synthesis

Excerpt

The two-year college may still be regarded among dowager circles as the "enfant terrible" of American education, but there can be little question that as an institution, it has arrived. Characteristic of any growing movement, however, particularly in its early stages, is a sensitivity to criticism, an unwillingness to admit that present philosophies do not represent eternal verities. The two-year college has seen its share of this point of view among the small band of pioneers who fostered and supported the institution in less affluent days.

With rapid expansion have come many able persons from the secondary schools and from the universities and colleges. The resulting influx of new ideas provides a challenge to the old guard to examine their positions, to defend them where facts permit, and to alter them when they are no longer applicable.

Change inevitably results in conflict between the defenders of the established order and those who see the need for new approaches to meet new problems. When the two-year college, as an institution, was required to struggle for its existence, little time was available for healthy controversy within the ranks of the faithful. All effort was required to sustain the organism. No one today, however, can claim that the existence of the two-year college as an important segment of American education is seriously threatened. The time has come to raise issues and to challenge relationships. Those within the field will raise no important questions that will not eventually come to the attention of those without.

There is yet another important reason for raising issue with certain

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