Mediaeval Germany, 911-1250: Essays by German Historians - Vol. 2

Mediaeval Germany, 911-1250: Essays by German Historians - Vol. 2

Mediaeval Germany, 911-1250: Essays by German Historians - Vol. 2

Mediaeval Germany, 911-1250: Essays by German Historians - Vol. 2

Excerpt

In view of the fact that this volume of essays has been preceded by an introductory study of certain phases and problems of German history, in the preface to which I have tried briefly to explain the objects of this work, few preliminary words are necessary in this place.

Nine essays by representative German historians are here presented to an English public in an English translation. The essays have been carefully selected, and together form a consecutive account of the history of Germany from the beginnings of a separate German kingdom in the tenth century to the end of the Hohenstaufen period. The volume starts with a general essay (I) which provides, in my view, the best short introduction to the history of mediaeval Germany, which is in existence. Here the determinative factors in the formation of mediaeval Germany are considered one by one, each element is assigned its place in the development of the German people as a whole, and the distinctive features of German development are emphasized by an illuminating comparison with France. The subsequent essays are arranged in an appropriate chronological order, divided into two groups by the great social and political upheaval which we call the Investiture Contest. We see (II) the legal foundations on which the relationship of church and state was built, not only in Germany but throughout Western Europe, before the revolutionary changes introduced in the eleventh century by the Cluniac movement and the Hildebrandine papacy; and we are thus able to understand the close co-operation of church and state, which was one of the main pillars of the old German monarchy. We see (III) the second influential factor in the early history of Germany: the vital forces embodied in the races comprised within the German state, and the strength of provincial life. We see, finally, the monarchy of Ottoman and early Salian days, the administration which it built up, the principles on which it . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.